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Question of the Week:

Question:
What is a Klinkhammer emerger I’ve heard so much of?
Answer:
I believe the story goes that a gentleman fly fisherman from Norway, with the same last name as the fly, developed this pattern to mimic an emerging caddis fly.  It got some publicity from a few fly fishing magazines and started catching on in the USA.  I first heard of it as a caddis emerger years ago.  Folks found it a great caddis imitation and felt if it’s that good imitating a caddis it will probably work as good imitating the Mayfly.  The rest is history.  The klinkhammer or Klink can be classified as a hatching emerger imitation.  I believe what makes this fly so successful in imitating an emerging mayfly is that half the body is under the meniscus while the other half is floating on the meniscus.  I think it’s the perfect imitation for copying exactly what a real mayfly looks like in that stage of it’s emergence.